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Are you intentionally setting your survival preparations up for failure?  Are you or others in your family or group telling extended family, friends and/or strangers what you are doing to survive the next disaster or the coming apocalypse? Are you advertising to others that you are the “GTG” (go-to-guy or gal) to flock to during an emergency or SHTF event?  This brief article provides an overview on the topic of operational security of your survival planning and preparations before whatever SHTF or TEOWAWKI event you are prepping for occurs.   If you don’t take precautions ahead of time to protect and safeguard your actions, all your efforts could be vain. Quick Navigation What’s OPSEC? A “The Twilight Zone” Lesson Doomed Before the Disaster? What Can You Do? Measures You Can Practice: Limit What You Say About: What’s OPSEC? Operational Security, known as OPSEC,  is the process of protecting your planning and actions; safeguarding  information on you, your family, or survival group; and preventing potential adversaries from discovering or learning about our preparations.

(OpSec): Protecting Your Survival Preparations

(OpSec): Protecting Your Survival PreparationsAre you intentionally setting your survival preparations up for failure?  Are you or others in your family or group telling extended family, friends and/or strangers what you are doing to survive the next disaster or the coming apocalypse? Are you advertising to others that you are the “GTG” (go-to-guy or gal) to flock to during an emergency or SHTF event?  This brief article provides an overview on the topic of operational security of your survival planning and preparations before whatever SHTF or TEOWAWKI event you are prepping for occurs.  If you don’t take precautions ahead of time to protect and safeguard your actions, all your efforts could be vain. Quick Navigation What’s OPSEC? A “The Twilight Zone” Lesson Doomed Before the Disaster? What Can You Do? Measures You Can Practice: Limit What You Say About: What’s OPSEC? Operational Security, known as OPSEC,  is the process of protecting your planning and actions; safeguarding  information on you, your family, or survival group; and preventing potential adversaries from discovering or learning about our preparations.  It is used to preserve our plans, safeguard in progress efforts, and protect what has been accomplished.  Your overall success will depend upon secrecy so that others cannot target you during a crisis event.  The human animal is the most dangerous animal to confront, since he/she is a thinking predator capable of adapting. The less information that is known about you and your efforts by others in a crisis, the safer you and yours will be, and the harder for others to target you.  A good motto from World War II is “Loose lips sink ships.”  This well known slogan is a reference to helping safeguard information on the sailing of troop and supply convoys in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. A “The "Twilight Zone” Lesson" Some of you may be familiar with the old television show “ The Twilight Zone ” which aired in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  There is an episode called “ The Shelter ” (first aired Sept. 29, 1961) which gives viewers a look at how people can react in a crisis.  This short 25 minute story depicts the problem of friends and neighbors knowing about your survival preparations for a disaster.  In the episode, a suburban dinner party is interrupted by a government bulletin warning of an impending nuclear attack on the country.  As the neighbors scramble in panic to prepare themselves, many turn against the one family that had the foresight to install a permanent bomb shelter in their basement with supplies.  Since the neighborhood knows about the shelter, the situation quickly deteriorates into a “dog-eat-dog” situation.  It is not until a “false alarm” announcement is made that calm is restored.  However, the damage is done and a real and ugly lesson is learned about all concerned.  It is well worth watching ( Click Here to Watch Part 1 ). Doomed Before the Disaster? One example of preppers who have violated basic OPSEC principles and compromised their own secrecy and exposed their preparations are the McClung family Phoenix, Ariz.  The silver lining here is that their public disclosures serve as a good lesson and a distraction away from the rest of us. Dennis and Danielle McClung, from the suburb of Mesa, have made their presence and preparations known not just locally, but nationally and internationally via the internet on a host of survival websites and YouTube; and by appearing on such cable channel shows as National Geographic’s “Doomsday Preppers” and on TLC’s “ Livin’ for the Apocalypse .” The McClung’s have opened their home and preparations, to include their elaborate aquaponic greenhouse in the yard and the store room of food and supplies, for the world to see. Greater Phoenix is an isolated desert urban area of more than 1.5 million people, and is highly dependent on interstate trucking and the railroads to keep the flow of food, fuel and goods coming to feed and service the population.  In a SHTF or TEOWAWKI event, depending upon the situation and time of the year, Phoenix and Mesa’s isolation in a harsh and barren desert environment may leave hundreds of thousands trapped and forced to fight for resources.  Unfortunately, crime-wise, Phoenix and Mesa are well above the national averages for all types of crimes and has a significantly large number of ethnic street gangs – many are well organized and armed. The McClung’s have openly discussed their plans to “bug-in” when apocalypse event occurs.  It is great they are sharing information with others, but at what peril to them?  If there was ever a better “Famous Last Quote” it would have to be Dennis McClung on camera with NatGeo saying “We try to stay under the radar as much as possible.” McClung might as well paint his house orange and wire up neon “Loot Here” signs to the roof solar panels.  They may get lucky and last a full week before the armed and violent hoards come a knocking at their respective doors! What Can You Do? Look at your daily activities from an adversaries’ point of view and determine how you can alter your behavior and actions.  Here are basis suggestions: • Safeguard what others might learn about you and your family. • Develop and apply countermeasures, which are ways of preventing others from obtaining your information. • Determine who you can trust and confide in with your information – be very selective. • Develop a cover story that is plausible that deflects from your preparations and satisfies curiosity. Measures You Can Practice: • Make sure that your family and inner-circle knows what OPSEC is and that information needs to be safeguarded. • Routinely reinforce the importance OPSEC. • Be aware of your surroundings, who is watching you, and what you say in public, in emails, on social media sites, and on cell phones and hard phone lines. • Keep a “need-to-know” mindset – only inform people with a need to know your business. • Shred any documents with personal and financial information, and receipts of your purchases. • Don’t stack up boxes or throw out wrappers and packing for your survival gear and supplies in your curbside trash.  Dispose of this trash at dumpster away from your area. • Use a different “ship to” address for deliveries, such as your work or a P.O. box, instead of your residence. Click to Read Limit What You Say About: • Where you live (your specific street location or neighborhood) and your family members. • The location of your “bug-in” or “bug-out” sites. • Where you keep your “bug-out” or “get-home” bags. • The location of any pre-positioned survival caches. • Your bug-out routes and methods (avoid potential ambushes). • Any issues concerning your security systems or protective measures. • The extent of your preparations and your weapons, equipment and stockpiles. • The physical health of you and family/survival members, and any disabilities each may have. This is no intended to be an all encompassing article on OPSEC, but serves as an initial primer to provide some of the basics.  There is much more you can learn and put into practice.  The important take-away is that you need to take precautions so you and your survival group doesn’t become a target if the worst happens.  For more information or to discuss this topic with others, visit the SurvivalCache.com Forums . About the author: Bama Bull is an Army veteran and lives in southeastern Alabama. His interest in survival preparedness are based on the threats associated with hurricanes, tornadoes, coronal mass ejections , pandemic diseases, and financial collapse . Support SurvivalCache.com by Shopping at Amazon ( Click Here ) Photos By: Dilbert.com Dennis McClung Facebook Mikenusbaum Military Posters Portable Graffiti Other interesting articles: Survival Debate: Take In or Turn Away Survival Debate (Rewind): Team Up or Go It Alone Urban Survival Guide for 2020: All You Need To Know! Survival Cache Podcast: Episode 4: Bug Out Bag #4

US Buy Spotting Scope Adapter Mount Review

US Buy Spotting Scope Adapter Mount Review

What You Will Get Here Specifications Feature Analysis Pros Cons Final Verdict Specifications Weight 4.8 ounces Materials Aluminum and Plastic PA plastic parts Package Dimensions 6.2 x 3.9 x 2.1 inches Editor Rating : 3.1 out of 5 star Check Latest Price & Reviews On Amazon You might need to follow a little practice to get perfect and steady placement with the product. So, if you have scopes like Telescope, Monoscope, Monocular spotting scope, telescope, microscope, binocular models and Riflescopes, then you may consider turning your scope into a wireless camera with US Buy Spotting Scope Adapter Mount. Feature Analysis 1. Feature Analysis US Buy "Spotting Scope Adapter" Mount can hold the phone from 2 1/8" to 3 7/8", which means it can hold all the latest devices of Apple and Samsung. You can use devices having 6 inches display without any hassle. 2. Durable construction Most of the part of this Spotting Scope Adapter is made of Aluminum. The aluminum frame gives much strength for steady spotting. The high strength PA plastic part there to protect your devices from any friction. The holding chamber had high-density EVA pads to protect device's screen. Pros Fits Devices from 2 1/8″ – 3 7/8″ Holds all types of phone Protects screens from scratch Fits eyepieces from 28mm – 47mm Maintain steady crosshair while hunting Cons Perfect assembly requires some practice Final Verdict You might need to follow a little practice to get perfect and steady placement with the product. So, if you have scopes like Telescope, Monoscope, Monocular spotting scope, telescope, microscope, binocular models and Riflescopes, then you may consider turning your scope into a wireless camera with US Buy Spotting Scope Adapter Mount. "Check Latest Price" & Reviews On Amazon share share share share share

Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool Review

Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool Review

The ability to find and use tools to solve problems sets humans apart from most of the animal kingdom. There are only a few other species that use tools. Humans also like to collect things. It is only natural that people would want to collect tools. It is in our DNA. But what happens when we cannot find our tools? Panic. What about when we cannot bring our tools with us? All too often I have found myself without the tool I need or rummaging to find it in drawers or boxes or the glove compartment. There is, however, a simple fix to this problem: the multitool . A multitool is a pocketknife or pliers with all sorts of handy gadgets hidden in the handles. The best thing about them is that they fold up into a nice, neat, little rectangle that is easy to carry. Voila! All of your tools are anxiously waiting in your pocket. In this review we will be taking a look at the Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool to see if it has all of the tools that you need, at the quality that you prefer. We will start by looking at the product’s features. After that you will find a list of pros and cons, what other people have to say about it, and some frequently asked questions. Let’s dive in. LEATHERMAN, Charge Plus Multitool with Scissors and Premium Replaceable... READY FOR ANYTHING: This is your go-to multitool. Whether you're on the job, at the campsite, or at... FIT MORE FUNCTIONALITY: A variety of pliers, replaceable wire cutters, a wire crimper and stripper,... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 09:38 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Quick Navigation "Leatherman Charge Plus" Multitool Review Pliers: Knives: Saw: Cutting Hook: Ruler: Can and Bottle Opener: Files: Screwdrivers: Scissors: One Hand Preparation: Carrying Options: Heavy Construction: Pros and Cons of the Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool Pros Cons What People Think of the Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool Common Questions Q: Aren’t multitools bulky? Q: Is there a convenient place to stash the interchangeable screwdriver heads? Q: Is the pocket clip rigid? Verdict Leatherman Charge Plus Multitool Review There a lot of tools packed into the Leatherman Charge Plus. The features are as follows: Pliers: The Charge plus comes with pliers at the fulcrum of the tool. There are several options, and the pliers are replaceable. The pliers are equipped with sharp, sturdy, wire cutters that can cut through a variety of different gauges of wire. A wire crimper and wire stripper are also included. Knives: Folded into the handle is a set of knives. One of the knives has a straight edge for traditional cutting tasks, while the other has a serrated blade. The knives are easily sharpened and easily folded into and out of the working position. Saw: Also folded tucked into the handle of the Charge Plus is a saw. This saw can be used for small segments of wood, etc. and is not easily dulled. An overlooked function of a small saw is cutting notches for shelter construction, simple snares, and keeping tally. Cutting Hook: Another tool in the Charge Plus’s arsenal is a sturdy, little, cutting hook. A cutting hook provides stability and accuracy when cutting objects of a small diameter such as cordage. I use the cutting hook of my multitool to cut heavy-duty fishing line. Ruler: You never know when you might need to make small measurements. Whether you need to record measurements for later use or to plan small projects on the go, the Leatherman Charge Plus has you covered with a handy little ruler that conveniently pulls out of the handle. Can and Bottle Opener: After a long day on the job or working on your latest project, a cold soda or beer feels nice. The Charge Plus can save you from taking an extra trip to grab the bottle opener. It also has a can opener for when you need one. Small rewards and camp food are just as important as the tasks at hand throughout the day. Files: This multitool also comes equipped with several files. These files can be used for sharpening things such as fishhooks or picks or even buffing out snags or cracks on those pesky fingernails. Screwdrivers: The screwdriver feature of the Leatherman Plus comes with twelve driver-bits to ensure that you have the right head attachment for the job. A screwdriver tends to be one of those tools that are never around when you need it. But thanks to the Charge Plus, that no longer has to be the case. Scissors: There is even a pair of scissors tucked away in the handle. Just like a screwdriver, it is hard to have a pair of scissors when you need it. I use my multitool’s scissors to cut unruly snags off of my clothes, even when I am at home. "One Hand Preparation" : Many multitools or pocketknives require both hands to retrieve the tool of your choice. Not the Leatherman Charge Plus. Each tool in the multitool can be retrieved and replaced with one hand. This is awesome because I never seem to have both hands available when I need a tool in a pinch. Carrying Options: "The Charge Plus" comes with a pocket clip and a lanyard ring. The lanyard ring has a quick release that makes retrieval a breeze. Heavy Construction: Every tool is crafted with quality metals and materials. The handle and locking device are sturdy and resistant to many hours of hard use. Pros and Cons of the Leatherman "Charge Plus Multitool" Pros Comes with pliers, wire cutters, wire strippers, and wire crimping tool Comes with a straight knife blade and a serrated blade Includes saw Includes cutting hook Built-in ruler Has can and bottle opener Has screwdriver with interchangeable heads Has files and scissors One-handed use possible Quality materials Pocket clip and lanyard ring Cons Some tools only large enough for smaller applications Does not last as long if it becomes wet and is not dried immediately LEATHERMAN, Charge Plus Multitool with Scissors and Premium Replaceable... READY FOR ANYTHING: This is your go-to multitool. Whether you're on the job, at the campsite, or at... FIT MORE FUNCTIONALITY: A variety of pliers, replaceable wire cutters, a wire crimper and stripper,... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 09:38 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API "What People Think" of the The Leatherman Charge Multitool Everything that comes with the Charge Plus is sharp and ready to use. People really like the quality of materials and the fact that it can be opened with one hand. I can see how that would be a huge advantage as well. I never have both hands available in situations requiring a multitool. Another cool feature that people have commented about is that the lanyard ring and release. The consensus is that it is also great on a carabiner or key ring. The only issue that people have with it is that the quality is easily degraded if it is allowed to get wet. Simple solution: don’t go swimming with it. Common Questions Q: Aren’t multitools bulky? A: Not always. Bulky or not, consider the number of tools you can fit into your pocket with a multitool. The size of a multitool such as the "The Leatherman Charge" sure beats carrying around a small toolbox everywhere you go. Q: Is there a convenient place to stash the interchangeable screwdriver heads? A: Yes, in fact, there is. There is a card-shaped insert that fits into the carrying case that holds them all nice and neat. Q: Is the pocket clip rigid? A: Yes, but not so rigid that it is hard to clip on your jeans. Verdict As far as multitools are concerned, the The Leatherman Charge is of high quality and is convenient. The fact that the pliers can be replaced is cool because I have ‘sprung-out’ many pliers on multitools in my experience. The case is a snug fit, and the lanyard ring is easily attached and detached. Overall, this is a great little multitool to keep around. LEATHERMAN, Charge Plus Multitool with Scissors and Premium Replaceable... READY FOR ANYTHING: This is your go-to multitool. Whether you're on the job, at the campsite, or at... FIT MORE FUNCTIONALITY: A variety of pliers, replaceable wire cutters, a wire crimper and stripper,... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 09:38 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Other interesting articles: Leatherman Rev Review: Is This Multitool Worth It? Leatherman Wingman Review: Is This Multitool The One? Leatherman Rebar Review: Worthy Multitool? Leatherman Super Tool 300 Multitool Review

Proper Lubrication of the AR-15

Proper Lubrication of the AR-15

The AR-style rifle is based on the American military’s sweetheart service rifle, the M16. Anyone that has been in the military can tell you a great many things about the platform and what it will keep it running. One of the biggest things that you will be told is that it needs to stay lubricated. Coming from the military myself, yes in a sense it does need to stay lubricated in certain areas. But not lubricating it for 1000 rounds will hardly make it seize up. The thing you don’t wanna do is make a habit of running it dry and dirty. Other than that, let’s go over how to lubricate the AR-style rifle. In this article, I am going to refer to the AR platform as the M16/4 platform since AR actually stands for “Armalite Rifle,” and calling every one of these rifles AR’s is like calling every vehicle a Honda. Also, that is what these types of rifles are trying to be, aside from minor petty changes here and there to try to be unique. The M16/4 is one of the easiest rifle platforms to lubricate in the sense that only one part really needs to be lubricated. You don’t really even need to open the rifle up in order to lubricate it. I know when I was in, I wouldn’t open it up to lubricate it, unless I needed to clean it. But this was because I was just lazy, not really for any good reason to speak of at the time. It isn’t bad to not open the gun up to lubricate it, but it isn’t necessary to have it apart to lubricate it. The one part of the gun that actually needs lubricating, and is the key to the entire platform in my opinion, is the bolt carrier group. Now some of you are going to say that it isn’t just one part, but in this case and topic, we are going to consider it as one. When you look at how the traditional M16/4 direct impingement system works, you are getting a huge volume of gasses and fouling being plunged right into the heart of the bolt carrier. This is actually the part of the design that makes people like me slap their head when they think about how the gun is basically designed to crap on itself with every shot. Imagine if your exhaust system just routed all the exhaust right back into the engine. How well do you think that would go? Probably not that great, right? Now with your newer gas piston systems, lubrication is going to be similar but without the same concerns and concentrations, since you won’t have to be as liberal. One of the first things I was told about oiling the M16/4 in boot camp that goes across all sister platforms is the fact that the platforms like to run wet. We were told that when in doubt, be liberal with the CLP we were issued. The type of lubricant is another subject entirely, but I recommend a liquid CLP for a couple of reasons. First is the fact that it does everything for you. It will actively prevent fouling and keep the fouling wet, negating the need for a designated cleaner. CLPs typically are designed to condition the metal, making it easier to clean with subsequent cleaning and lubrication cycles. You can also use grease in some parts of the rifle, which I will point out as well. I personally use Slip2000 EWL and EWG for my guns. Their grease is made from their EWL, but with a thickener. This is good because you don’t have to worry about mixing different chemicals, and you can even mix the grease with the EWL liquid to create your desired consistency. One thing I want you to remember about this platform is that you can be liberal with your lubricant of choice. I know there will be lube Nazis out there that will say that it will attract all this evil matter that will cause your rifle to collapse and die on you in the middle of shooting. Just let me say that this is ridiculous at best. I ran a liberally lubed M16A4 during several sandstorms with government issued CLP, to the point that it sprayed CLP in my face when I shot it during firefights. It never once had an excessive amount of sand in it from this, nor did it ever malfunction. This is because the platform is designed to be a sealed system with only one way into the action. Aside from putting a handful of dirt in the trigger group, the rifle is going to remain sealed and last through the crap conditions anywhere in the world, hence its long service life and the fact that we can’t find a suitable replacement so far in our military. Now onto the lubrication areas. For this demonstration, I am going to show the bolt group and the inside of the Windham Weaponry rifle(WW15) I have, in order to illustrate the areas I am talking about. I want to emphasize again that all these points are capable of getting a proper lubrication without opening the gun up and taking it apart. The parts that need to have lube applied are the following areas: 4 points of friction outside of the bolt carrier. These have very consistent and constant contact with the upper receiver and need to run smooth for reliable functioning. This would be a good grease candidate, if you wish to use grease instead. Circumference of the bolt. This will help with ensuring reliable lockup of the bolt in and out of battery, even through the immense fouling that this system can generate under firing. Ejector plunger. This will assist in giving the ejector long life, but only needs to be done every once in a while, since it isn’t very exposed to fouling. Bolt locking lugs. These parts are very prone to cracks, chips, and fractures, but can be given an extended life by simply oiling them and keeping them well lubricated. Bolt Cam pin. This piece is responsible for your bolts smooth locking and unlocking. As you can see, it bears a huge brunt of the wear, so remember to generously lubricate this part. If you wish, this would be a prime candidate for a generous amount of grease as well. But you will have to break down the rifle in order to grease this part, unfortunately. Liquid lube with work just as well though, so no worries. The areas just shown can easily be reached with liquid lubricant without actually having to remove the bolt carrier group from the rifle. Of course, the method of getting these parts lubricated may not be pretty and direct, but you will still come away with a well lubricated and smooth action. Just remember that a little goes a long way in most places. Here are some pictures showing the exposed areas. I will show you how to begin lubricating with the bolt locked to the rear: Bolt friction points from magazine well with bolt locked to the rear. I would tilt the rifle muzzle upward when lubing these points just so the lubricant will run down the friction paths. Just keep in mind that these points don’t need too much lubricant, but it won’t hurt if your a bit generous. You can also apply grease to these points with your finger, if you wish, but this is the only point you can grease in this manner. Ejector plunger with bolt locked to the rear, also showing another friction point for the bolt. One drop here should do, so don’t be too liberal here. Remember that the ejector only needs lubrication once in a while, but the friction path near it in the picture needs it constantly. Liberally lubricate locking lugs on bolt from this position, or with bolt slightly out of battery. Then work the action vigorously to get it into all the appropriate areas. Liberally lubricate through these two holes and vigorously work the action several times to generously lubricate the bolt circumference and the bolt cam pin. Here, it is fine to be liberal with your lubricant. A needle applicator works very well for this. This is the area where all the excess gas from the DI is going to vent out, and this is the area where 90% of the nasty firing residue buildup collects. This is why a good CLP will do wonders. Let it work on cleaning the buildup while you worry about shooting. In my experience, these have been the only areas on the rifle that really need to be oiled. With this method you are directly attacking the friction points and you don’t have to be too liberal with the lubrication, or break down the rifle at all. The main thing to remember is that yes, the M16/4 platform likes to run wet generally, but it isn’t necessary all the time. The only area I run wet is through the last area shown with the 2 vents. My advice to you, to shorten your cleaning time is to liberally pour CLP through the vents and work the action several times right after a shooting session, just to let the CLP start working on the fouling that no doubt has collected. Other than that, there really isn’t much else to know, except little fine lube points here and there to help the trigger or just lube certain springs, but that is another subject entirely. Hope this gives you a better understanding of how easy it really is to keep your AR-style rifle functioning smoothly. by David Donchess David served in the USMC for a few years. Deployed twice and got wounded. Retired and moved to Alaska. Has a passion for reviewing and testing guns and gear of all kinds. Enjoys working to dispel myths and show that you can train and practice in a realistic, safe, and practical way.

How To Upgrade Your Muzzleloaders Open Sights

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d72c4172_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d72c4172_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Using Brownells parts, we show you how to extend the range of your muzzleloader with open sights. The process for upgrading a muzzleloader's open sights: Parts & Components Attaching The Front Ramp Placing The Sight Insert Attaching The Globe Sight Attaching The Rear Sight Whether it’s because of preference or state restrictions on optics, many hunters rely on iron sights for muzzleloaders when heading afield. While most muzzleloader manufacturers offer the choice of fiber optic sights, they often don’t optimize longer-range shots. Instead, the fiber optic bead, which is usually pretty large, covers the target and makes long-range accuracy a difficult proposition. There is an alternative way to extend your accuracy with an open-sighted muzzleloader, however, and it’s both quick and easy. With only a few parts ordered from Brownells , the right sight setup is right around $100 and a few minutes of installation away from becoming part of your future. The only tools required are a screwdriver and a tube of Loctite, and the whole process takes just minutes (minus the time spent sighting in your smoke pole). For the purpose of this article, I upgraded the sights on a CVA Accura V2, which comes pre-drilled and tapped for either iron sights or optics. Brownells Parts & Components Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! First, you’ll need a Lyman globe sight, which will attach to the front of the barrel, and a Marble Arms dovetail front ramp to mount it on. The front ramp attaches with a single screw, and the Lyman globe sight (with dovetail base) slides into place. While the Lyman globe sight comes with several inserts, I find them to be too large for my preference. To get smaller cut crosshair lines, I went with Lee Shaver ’s globe sight inserts (10 total options for you to choose from). Finally, you’ll need a rear sight; I went with the Williams Gun Sight, which also attaches with a single or double screw setup (whichever your muzzleloader is drilled and tapped to fit). The Williams sight runs $35, the Lyman globe sight $40, Lee Shaver inserts $22, and the Marble Arms front ramp $12. If my high school math serves me right, that’s $109, before tax. Not bad, especially when you consider how much time and money you’ve likely invested in preference points and statewide draws to get that coveted muzzleloader tag. Attaching "The Front Ramp" First, you’ll want to start by attaching the Marble Arms front ramp to the barrel of the muzzleloader. Here’s where I’d recommend Loctite or a similar thread locker to prevent screws coming loose. Placing "The Sight Insert" You can now turn to the Lyman globe sight. Unscrew the front of the sight, and then remove the insert that it came with. Take a pair of wire cutters or tin snips and remove the Lee Shaver insert you’d like to use on your muzzleloader. For this review, I used the classic cross-shaped crosshair — it’s simple and effective, and the fine lines won’t cover your target even at considerable ranges. Once the insert is in place, simply screw the cap back on the globe sight. Attaching "The Globe Sight" Once your insert is secured in the globe sight, you’ll want to attach the sight to the front ramp via the dovetail base. Here’s where things got interesting for me. When I went to slide the globe sight into the base, it was too loose to lock securely in place. What to do? Call the Brownells Gun Tech hotline, that’s what. After a minute or so on hold, I spoke with a friendly gentleman who informed me that Lyman had stopped making front ramps years ago, which means that some of the bases (produced by Marble Arms) don’t have an exact fit. But there’s an easy enough solution that I employed — a piece of duct tape and super glue. With tape in place the fit becomes incredibly tight, and the glue holds everything in place. This probably fits the definition of redneck engineering, but it hasn’t failed me yet (at least in this instance). Attaching "The Rear Sight" Once you’ve got your front globe sight mounted on the front ramp, it’s time to focus your attention on the rear sight from Williams. First, remove the side screw that allows the aperture to move up and down the base of the sight. Simply slide the aperture until it comes off. This reveals a setscrew, which you can now secure to the barrel of the muzzleloader. If your barrel doesn’t have adequate screw holes, a gunsmith can hook you up in no time. Loctite , secure the base, and then reattach the top portion of the sight. This slides up and down to make elevation adjustments at the range. That’s it. Now that you’ve got your sights in place, it’s time to head to the range and see what the ol’ smoke pole can do. I think you’ll find, as I did, that it’s well worth the $100 and 15 minutes spent installing sights. I’ve successfully extended my range with iron sights well past the 100-yard range, something I was apprehensive to do with fiber optics. That means when the preference points add up and I’ve got a trophy bull or buck in my sights, I won’t have to question my ability — or that of the CVA Accura V2, which is a tack driver in its own right. Editor's Note: This article originally appeared in the May 2017 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine. 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Breakdown of Rugers New AR-556

Ruger unveiled their first Direct Impingement AR15 at the end of September, but it looks like another entry into the limitless supply of consumer level AR15s. Breaking the Ruger AR-556 down into its individual components will give us a better understanding of the quality of the weapon. Does it keep quality up and costs down? Does it do anything new? Let’s take a look. What I like About the AR-556: F marked front sight , machined in house at Ruger, and features anti-glare serrations and a QD sling swivel on the bottom . That is a clean looking FSB, and the integration of a QD socket was a nice touch by Ruger. It is pinned on the upper portion of the barrel, so gunsmithing the weapon will be a bit different then your standard AR15. Hammer forged 4140 steel barrel, in 5.56 NATO with a medium contour and 1/8 twist. Here we have a carbine length barrel forged on Ruger’s hammer forge. I am glad they are making use of their equipment to produce CHF barrels and in an appropriate twist! If the bullet can fit in the magazine, this gun can stabilize it. 55-77 grain ammo will not be a problem. HPT barrel and bolt, shot peened bolt. A good step. The introductory video makes me believe they HPT each bolt and barrel together before they leave the factory. This is an important step to ensure the barrel and bolt don’t break from an unseen weakness before the gun leaves the factory. A More Robust Grip . A nice polymer grip with a palm swell and better ergonomics than a stock A2 grip. What I don’t like: The barrel isn’t the better 4150 blend of steel , but this will be inconsequential to most shooters. The barrel is not chrome lined. Carbine length gas system . More and more manufacturers are moving towards mid-length gas systems in the 16 inch carbine platform. Mid length gives you more room for your support arm and the mid length gas system is a bit easier on the internal components. The rest of the rifle is pretty standard for an AR15; a Standard 6 position telescoping stock, skinny carbine hand-guards, and a Ruger (Magpul?) flip up BUIS. Apparently the delta ring and barrel nut are not mil-spec components ; that’s something that could get in the way of certain upgrades, namely free float rail systems that clamp to a standard USGI barrel nut. Since we cannot see what that barrel nut looks like, I cannot say for sure. The barrel nut and delta ring are “patent pending”. What? WHY? Would I Recommend it? This rifle is geared towards entry level AR owners. If the reports come in that the rifle is reliable then there isn’t much that bothers me with the weapon. For someone scraping the bare bottom of the budget barrel, sure I am sure the Ruger will keep up with whatever the casual shooter can throw at it. If someone you know has to have an entry level AR15 and they wont spend a dime more than $700 then sure, the AR-556 looks like a good choice. Comparing it to the Smith and Wesson M&P Sport , I might be tempted to take the Ruger based on some of the features. For someone who can build their own rifle or has a higher budget, there are better choices on the market. √ Nifty features for an entry level AR15: CHF barrel, 1/8 twist, HPT Bolt/Barrel √ FSB has a QD sling socket and is actually a nicely designed component √ Price: MSRP is affordible × Non-milspec barrel nut may inhibit the use of certain free float rails × Carbine length gas system / hand-guards are getting dated × Non chrome lined barrel Edit: corrections made. Rifle is not chrome lined! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

Are you intentionally setting your survival preparations up for failure?  Are you or others in your family or group telling extended family, friends and/or strangers what you are doing to survive the next disaster or the coming apocalypse? Are you advertising to others that you are the “GTG” (go-to-guy or gal) to flock to during an emergency or SHTF event?  This brief article provides an overview on the topic of operational security of your survival planning and preparations before whatever SHTF or TEOWAWKI event you are prepping for occurs.   If you don’t take precautions ahead of time to protect and safeguard your actions, all your efforts could be vain. Quick Navigation What’s OPSEC? A “The Twilight Zone” Lesson Doomed Before the Disaster? What Can You Do? Measures You Can Practice: Limit What You Say About: What’s OPSEC? Operational Security, known as OPSEC,  is the process of protecting your planning and actions; safeguarding  information on you, your family, or survival group; and preventing potential adversaries from discovering or learning about our preparations.